Tuesday, March 08, 2011

Gift of Life (Bone Marrow) Request & EZ Reads 3/8/11

Just a few pieces for a slow Tuesday, and one important request:

The 1-year old daughter of Hindy Poupko and Seth Galena (of Bangitout I believe), Ayelet Yakira Galena, was recently diagnosed with a rare bone marrow failure disorder and will need a bone marrow transplant. Gift of Life is an incredible organization which does simple cheek swabs (essentially a Q-tip in your mouth for a few seconds) and keeps a record of your bone marrow on file, so if you're ever a match for someone who needs it they'll know. I did a swab 10 years ago, and it was the easiest way to potentially help save someone's life - and you never need to do a swab again. From one of the e-mails I received:
Here are some ways you can help us out:

1. You and everyone you know can get your cheeks swabbed at the bone marrow and sent it to the gift of life here is the direct link

2. If you think you are already in the registry, double check here:

3. Currently, Gift of Life (the Jewish bone marrow registry) does not have the funds to process all of the new registrants (each test costs $54) so consider donating to Gift of Life through our dedicated donors circle at: If you cannot afford it I am personally working on getting sponsors.

4. If you banked your child's cord blood and would consider donating it in the event that it is match - please be in touch with us

5. Forward this email to everyone you know.

6. Upcoming drives:

March 7th, 2:00-7:00pm, New York Region of Hadassah
5 West 58th Street, NY, NY 10019

March 19th and March 20th, 8:30-11:00 PM, The Jewish Center
131 W. 86th St., New York, NY

Thank you for your time and help, Hindy Poupko and Seth Galena
  • A fantastic article in the NY Times called The Tire Iron and the Tamale, via Rafi, on a man who has been stranded three times on the side of the road in the past year, and the people who came to help him out. Excerpts:
    Each time, when these things happened, I was disgusted with the way people didn’t bother to help. [...] But you know who came to my rescue all three times? Immigrants. Mexican immigrants. None of them spoke any English. [...]

    His wife produced a large water jug for us to wash our hands in. I tried to put a 20 in the man’s hand, but he wouldn’t take it, so instead I went up to the van and gave it to his wife as quietly as I could. [...] After I said my goodbyes and started walking back to the Jeep, the girl called out and asked if I’d had lunch. When I told her no, she ran up and handed me a tamale.

    This family, undoubtedly poorer than just about everyone else on that stretch of highway, working on a seasonal basis where time is money, took a couple of hours out of their day to help a strange guy on the side of the road while people in tow trucks were just passing him by.

    But we weren’t done yet. I thanked them again and walked back to my car and opened the foil on the tamale (I was starving by this point), and what did I find inside? My $20 bill! I whirled around and ran to the van and the guy rolled down his window. He saw the $20 in my hand and just started shaking his head no. All I could think to say was, “Por favor, por favor, por favor,” with my hands out. The guy just smiled and, with what looked like great concentration, said in English: “Today you, tomorrow me.”
  • Waiting For Next Year has a great piece on the NFL labor dispute, saying "Don't Pick Sides" in the Plain Dealer, then continuing on the blog.
  • The Times has a fun piece on Cleveland envy among Knicks fans. That's what happens when 25% of the lowly Cavs' wins are against the same team.